Tell me about adding investing accounts


Unlike financial portals or brokerage websites, Quicken helps you track all your investments in one place—including the tax implications.

Which investing accounts should I add?

Quicken account Real-world account
Brokerage

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Most investment account types

A brokerage account can hold one or more securities (such as stocks, bonds, or mutual funds), with or without an associated cash management or money market fund (sometimes called a "sweep" fund).

Employee stock plans

Use a brokerage account type to track Employee Stock Option Grants (ESOG) and Employee Stock Purchase Plans (ESPP). To simplify record keeping, we recommend tracking each of these in a dedicated account. Add a brokerage account, and then use the appropriate procedures to enter the grant and exercise transactions or buy and sell ESPP shares.

Other

You can use the Brokerage account type to track any security with a fluctuating value, for which you want to track performance, income, capital gains, or tax implications. Use this account type to track variable or fixed annuities, real estate investment trusts (REITS) or partnerships, and unit trusts. Just add the appropriate number of shares and price, and then periodically update the security price.
401(k)/403(b)

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401(k) or 403(b) accounts

Use the 401(k)/403(b) account type to track employer-sponsored retirement plans. Contributions to these accounts are tax-deferred, and your employer may make matching contributions. Quicken can track your holdings whether or not your statement reports transaction-level detail or the exact number of shares you own.
IRA or Keogh plan

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Individual Retirement Accounts and IRA-type accounts

Quicken lets you specify the type:
  • Traditional - A tax-deferred investment and savings account that meets government regulations for individual retirement savings. Contributions can be deductible or nondeductible. Earnings can grow tax-deferred until withdrawal (usually retirement), at which time they are taxed as ordinary income.
  • Roth - An investment and savings account that meets government regulations for individual retirement savings. Contributions are not deductible from current income taxes. Earnings can grow tax-deferred and with some exceptions are not taxed upon withdrawal.
  • SEP-IRA A - tax-deferred retirement plan provided by sole proprietors or small businesses. Contributions are made by the self-employed person. Contributions and earnings are tax-deferred until retirement.
  • SIMPLE IRA - A SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees) is a tax-deferred retirement plan for businesses with fewer than 100 employees and the self-employed. Employees may defer a certain amount of their salary to go to their IRAs, and employers must contribute to all employees, though contribution amounts for employees not participating in the plan are lower. SIMPLE IRA (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees) have different early withdrawal penalties from traditional IRAs. Consult a tax professional or the IRS Web site for complete details.
  • Education IRA - An investment and savings account established solely for the purpose of paying higher education expenses. Contributions are not deductible from current income taxes. Earnings grow tax-deferred and distributions are tax-free if used to pay qualified educational expenses.
  • Coverdell ESA - A Coverdell Education Savings Account is a tax-advantaged investment account designed to encourage savings to cover future education expenses. Coverdell ESAs allow money to grow tax deferred and proceeds to be withdrawn tax free for qualified education expenses at a qualified institution. However, the definition of qualified expenses in an ESA includes primary and secondary school, not just college and university.  
  • Keogh plan - A tax-deferred retirement plan for self-employed workers or individuals who earn self-employment income. Contributions are made by the self-employed person. Contributions and earnings are tax-deferred until retirement.
529 plan

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529 plan accounts

Use the 529 plan account type to track your education savings account. When you add a 529 plan to Quicken, Quicken automatically marks the account as tax-deferred.
Single mutual fund (Tell me how) A fund you purchase directly from the mutual fund company. The single mutual fund account type is only for funds that meet these three conditions:
  • You buy the fund directly from the mutual fund company
  • Your account has no cash balance—any funds you contribute are automatically used to purchase shares; any dividends you receive are either sent to you or automatically reinvested
  • If you buy another fund, the mutual fund company requires you to open a separate account

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